Syllabus

INTERNET GOVERNANCE: MAPPING INTERNET GOVERNANCE PRINCIPLES, POLICIES AND PRACTICES (FA14_MCC-GE 2305 – 001)

Syllabus, Fall 2014

Stefaan G. Verhulst (sverhulst@nyu.edu)

Thursdays, 4.55 – 7.05 PM

25 West 4th Street, C7 

(There are no office hours but a meeting can always be scheduled by sending an email to sverhulst@nyu.edu)

Short Description

This course covers the principles, institutions, and policies that seek to govern the Internet globally, along with the narratives associated with Internet Governance.

The Internet has become an essential platform and engine for economic development, social justice and the protection of human rights. At the same time, the issue of global Internet Governance raises challenging questions regarding where the control of the Internet should reside (if any), what guiding principles should be used and who should take part in the policy making process.

The objectives of the course are to review the principles, policies and institutions involved, as well as to raise a deeper understanding of the major Internet governance narratives and issues, such as the concept of architectural openness and the promotion of Internet Freedom. The course begins by introducing and exploring the concepts, history, and narratives of Internet governance, and then delves into Internet governance issues along an “ACCTT” framework (access, content, code, trust, and trade). The course ends by looking at the recent developments that may inform the future of Internet Governance.

Weekly discussions and tracking of developmental shifts in the way the Internet is governed will allow students to gain insight into possible future directions of the medium.

Student interaction and contributions to a class blog is to be a key element, besides writing an essay, making a policy analysis of a current Internet governance topic and one review paper.

Outline

I. Concepts, History, and Narratives of Internet Governance

  1. Introduction: the Internet and Internet Governance
  2. Internet governance as global governance
  3. A brief history of Internet Governance
  4. Principles and Narratives associated with Internet Governance
  5. “Internet Freedom” and the politics of human rights
  6. Multi-stakeholder governance models and democratic practices

II. Internet Governance along an ACCTT Framework

  1. Access – Governing the Internet as an Infrastructure
  2. Code – Governing Standards and Protocols
  3. Content – Internet Censorship and Content Control
  4. Content – Protecting Intellectual Property and Innovation
  5. Trust – Trust on the Internet: Privacy and Security
  6. Trade – Governing the Internet and Global Trade

III. The Future of the Internet and Internet Governance

  1. The future of the Internet and Internet Governance

Evaluation Procedures

20%     1 Review Paper or Map or Lit Review (based on a comparative discussion of selected weekly readings) completed by week 7. (max. 5 pages)

20%     1 Policy Analysis Paper of a contemporary Internet Governance Topic (list will be shared): completed by week 9 (max 5 pages) – (possibly contribution to a mapping )

5%       “Why Internet Governance Matters” Essay Project Outline (based on a choice of themes that will be provided by week 4. The idea is to connect the issues we discuss during class with real people’s lives): completed by week 8;

25%     Essay Paper due week 14 (separate sheet will be provided with more details)

20%     Take-Home Exam (2 questions will be shared at the beginning of exam period)

10%     Class and Blog Participation (Mandatory to add one item each week to the blog)

Accessing the blog 

A blog has been created for the course and is available at https://internetgovernance2014.wordpress.com/

Each student is encouraged to post entries on recent developments regularly (at a min. one item every week).

You will be invited to become a member of the space following the first class.

Other Policies

Absences and Lateness

More than two unexcused absences will automatically result in a lower grade. Chronic lateness will also be reflected in your evaluation of participation. Regardless of the reason for your absence you will be responsible for any missed work. Travel arrangements do not constitute a valid excuse for rescheduling exams. There are no extra credit assignments for this class.

No late papers will be accepted without written permission from the instructor.

Format

Please type and double-space your written work. Typing improves the clarity and readability of your work and double-spacing allows room for me to comment. Please also number and staple multiple pages. You are free to use your preferred citation style (Chicago, MLA, APA)–please use it consistently in all your assignments. If sending a document electronically, please name the file in the following format Yourlastname Coursenumber Assignment1.doc

Evaluation Rubric

A= Excellent

This work is comprehensive and detailed, integrating themes and concepts from discussions, lectures and readings. Writing is clear, analytical and organized. Arguments offer specific examples and concisely evaluate evidence. Students who earn this grade are prepared for class, synthesize course materials and contribute insightfully.

B=Good

This work is complete and accurate, offering insights at general level of understanding. Writing is clear, uses examples properly and tends toward broad analysis. Classroom participation is consistent and thoughtful.

C=Average

This work is correct but is largely descriptive, lacking analysis. Writing is vague and at times tangential. Arguments are unorganized, without specific examples or analysis. Classroom participation is inarticulate.

D= Unsatisfactory

This work is incomplete, and evidences little understanding of the readings or discussions. Arguments demonstrate inattention to detail, misunderstand course material and overlook significant themes. Classroom participation is spotty, unprepared and off topic.

F=Failed

This grade indicates a failure to participate and/or incomplete assignments

Grading Scale

A = 94-100

A- = 90-93

B+ = 87-89

B = 84-86

B- = 80-83

C+ = 77-79

C = 74-76

C- = 70-73

D+ = 67-69

D = 64-66

F = 63 and below

General Decorum

Slipping in late or leaving early, sleeping, text messaging, surfing the Internet, doing homework in class, eating, etc. are distracting and disrespectful to all participants in the course.

Academic Dishonesty and Plagiarism

“Academic integrity is the guiding principle for all that you do…you violate the principle when you: cheat on an exam; submit the same work for two different courses without prior permission from your professors; receive help on a take-home courses without prior permission from your professors; receive help on a take-home that calls for independent work; or plagiarize. Plagiarism, whether intended or not, is academic fraud. You plagiarize when, without proper attribution, you do any of the following: copy verbatim from a book, article, or other media; download documents from the Internet; purchase documents; paraphrase or restate someone else’s facts, analysis, and/or conclusions…” (see http://steinhardt.nyu.edu/policies/academic_integrity)

Units and readings – all available at NYU Classes

(Please select at 3 readings at a minimum for each week – in case there are more suggested)

I. Concepts, History, and Narratives of Internet Governance

  1. Introduction: the Internet and Internet Governance 

Issues to be considered:

  • How does the Internet work, and its implications for control and governance?
  • The Internet as a multi-use platform, and the diversity of issues and actors involved.
  • The Internet as a global, converged medium with other media, and the challenges of balkanization and fragmentation.

Readings:

  1. Internet governance as global governance

Issues to be considered:

  • Principles and challenges of global governance in a connected world.
  • Legitimacy and participatory deficits in current governance structures.
  • The move toward a multi-polar world, and the challenge of cultural, economic and data protectionism.

Readings:

  • Brousseau, Eric, Meryem Marzouki, and Cécile Méadel. “Introduction.” In Governance, Regulation, and Powers on the Internet. Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge UP, 2012, 3-26.
  • Coglianese, “Globalization and the Design of International Institutions.” In: Nye, J. & J. Donahue. Governance in a Globalizing World. Brookings Institution Press, 2000, 297 – 315.
  • Koppell, Jonathan G. S. “Introduction: The Organization of Global Rulemaking,” and “Accountability and Legitimacy-Authority Tension in Global Governance.” In World Rule: Accountability, Legitimacy, and the Design of Global Governance. Chicago: University of Chicago, 2010.
  • Mueller, Milton. “Do Networks Govern?” In Networks and States: The Global Politics of Internet Governance (Information Revolution and Global Politics). Cambridge, MA: MIT, 2010.
  • Nye, Joseph S. “The Regime Complex for Managing Global Cyber Activities.” Center for International Governance Innovation (CIGI), Global Commission on Internet Governance Paper Series No. 1. May 20, 2014.
  1. A brief history of Internet Governance

Issues to be considered:

  • The creation of ICANN as an experiment in non-governmental Internet governance.
  • The role of the United Nations, the World Summit of the Information Society (WSIS) and the debate on intergovernmental governance models.
  • The Internet Governance Forum and other attempts to institutionalize collective action regarding the Internet.
  • Netmundial, the High Level Panel on Global Internet Cooperation and Governance Mechanisms and the emerging Distributed Governance Paradidm

Readings:

  • Brousseau, Eric, Meryem Marzouki,and Cécile Méadel. “Internet Governance and the Question of legitimacy.” In Governance, Regulation, and Powers on the Internet. Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge UP, 2012.
  • Vint Cerf, Patrick S. Ryan, and Max Senges. “Internet Governance is Our Shared Responsibility.” I/S: A Journal of Law and Policy for the Information Society, 10 ISJLP 1 (2014). August 13, 2013.
  • Curran, James, et al. “Rethinking internet history” In Misunderstanding the Internet. New York: Routledge, 2012.
  • Crawford, Susan P. “The ICANN Experiment,” 12 Cardozo Journal of International Comparative Law, 409, Fall 2004.
  • Kleinwachter, Wolfgang. “The History of Internet Governance.” In Governing the Internet: Freedom and Regulation in the OSCE Region. Vienna: OSCE, 2007
  • Mathiason, John, Milton Mueller, Hans Klein, Marc Holitscher, and Lee McKnight. “Internet Governance: The State of Play.” September 2004.
  • Mueller, Milton. “The Root as Resource.” In Ruling the Root: Internet Governance and the Taming of Cyberspace. Cambridge, MA: MIT, 2002.
  • Ziewitz, Malte and Ian Brown, “A Prehistory of Internet Governance.” In Research Handbook on Governance Of The Internet, Ian Brown, ed., Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, 2012.
  • NETMundial Multistakeholder Statement. NETMundial Global Multistakeholder Meeting on the Future of Internet Governance. April 24, 2014.
  • Towards a Collaborative, Decentralized Internet Governance Ecosystem. Report by the Panel on Global Internet Governance Ecosystem. May, 2014.
  1. Principles and Narratives associated with Internet Governance 

Issues to be considered:

  • The meaning and implication of architectural principles such as openness, end-to-end and interoperability.
  • Comparative and normative approaches to Internet control.
  • Balkanization versus the Internet as a common medium.

Readings:

  1. “Internet Freedom” and the politics of human rights

Issues to be considered:

  • “Access to the Internet” or “Freedom to connect” as a human right.
  • Challenges and responsibilities of foreign Internet companies in non-democratic countries.
  • Circumvention of government control through technical means.

Readings:

  1. Multi-stakeholder governance models and democratic practices

Issues to be considered:

  • The concept of multi-stakeholder governance approaches.
  • Practices, promises and limitations of participatory models of governing.
  • Structural deficits of existing global governance structures
  • New models of “networked governance” such as Wikipedia

Readings:

II. Internet Governance along an ACCTT Framework

  1. Access – Governing the Internet as an Infrastructure

Issues to be considered:

  • Overcoming disparities in spread and accessibility of the Internet globally.
  • Broadband divide and Internet literacy.
  • Net neutrality and other traffic discriminatory challenges.
  • Spectrum management at a time of wireless Internet worldwide 

Readings:

  1. Code – Governing Standards and Protocols

Issues to be considered:

  • Code is law/Architecture is politics
  • Protocol politics and standard development bodies
  • The concept of “Values in Design” and its implication for Internet governance

Readings:

  • Busch, Lawrence. “Standards and Democracy.” In Standards:  Recipes for Reality, MIT Press, 2011, 269-288.
  • DeNardis, Laura. “Scarcity and Internet Governance” and “Protocol Select as Power Selection.” In Protocol Politics: The Globalization of Internet Governance, MIT Press, 2009. 1-24 and 25-69.
  • Van, Schewick Barbara. Internet Architecture and Innovation. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2010
  • Palfrey John and Urs Gasser. Introduction: “Why Interop Matters.” In Interop: the Promise and Perils of Highly Interconnected Systems. New York: Basic Books, 2012.
  • Resnick, Pete. RFC 7282: On Consensus and Humming in the IETFInternet Engineering Task Force. June, 2014.
  1. Content – Internet Censorship and Content Control

Issues to be considered:

  • Technical and non-technical means of Internet Censorship
  • Governmental and industry practices of controlling content
  • Re-defining freedom of speech in a networked environment

Readings:

10. Content – Protecting Intellectual Property and Innovation

Issues to be considered:

  • The challenge of protecting copyright and preventing privacy in a global networked world.
  • The narratives and concepts of public domain, creative commons and global public goods.
  • The impact of IPR enforcement on innovation and the Internet

Readings:

11. Trust – Trust on the Internet: Privacy and Security

Issues to be considered:

  • Comparative and divergent approaches to protecting privacy in an age of voluntary disclosure and secondary use of personal information.
  • Militarization of the Internet, and other challenges of cyber security.
  • Calls for collective action to prevent cyber attacks and to harmonize privacy rules globally.

Readings:

12. Trade – Governing the Internet and Global Trade

Issues to be considered:

  • The importance of trade rules for the free flow of information
  • The intersection between trade governance and Internet governance
  • Attempts to define the Internet within the concept of global trade rules

Readings:

III. The future of the Internet and Internet Goverance

13. The future of the Internet and Internet Governance

Issues to be considered:

  • The potential impact of Big Data and Social Media on Internet Governance
  • The Internet of things and everything
  • The growing voice of emerging countries in global governance
  • The intersection of Internet governance and other global issues (such as national security; economic growth and development)
  • Internet governance and open governance

Readings:

 

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